How To Deep Clean Granite Benchtops

Granite benchtops are a no-brainer when it comes to renovating or designing a new kitchen. Granite is durable, resistant to daily life and easily cleaned – but this does not mean it doesn’t require a little bit of love. Granite needs to be thoroughly cleaned every once in a while, in order to maintain that perfect just-installed appearance. It’s important to know how to treat your granite. We found this article which nicely explains the dos and don’ts of granite care.




No two granite benchtops are the same. Some come from the factory with a resin treatment. Others require a sealant to be applied from every year to every few years. You should consult the manufacturer of your countertop for the recommended treatment.

Since granite is porous, a sealer is there to protect the granite from potentially harmful materials that can affect the appearance and lifespan of the granite.

Regardless of the type of granite or seal, what doesn’t vary is what you should not be cleaning your granite countertops with. You should avoid using acid-based cleaners — lemon, orange, vinegar or bleach-based — on granite. The acids contained in these cleaners will degrade the sealant and can leave unsightly stains on the countertop.

That means those Clorox disinfecting wipes (which contain citric acid) that make cleanup so easy are actually quite bad for your granite’s seal.


Daily cleaning of granite is actually quite simple. All you need is a wash cloth, warm water, a small amount of dish soap and a hand towel for drying.

Use the warm, soapy dish cloth to wipe up spills or other grime immediately. Follow up with a quick towel dry to get rid of excess water and avoid streaks.

It’s also good practice to do this any time your cook in your kitchen, if not daily.

If you want to disinfect your granite, simply mix equal parts isopropyl alcohol and distilled water in a spray bottle. Thoroughly spray the countertop and allow the solution to sit for 2 to 3 minutes. Wipe down with a wash cloth. This should also restore your granite’s brilliant shine.


If you have a particularly stubborn stain, such as spilled cooking oil, baking soda may be all you need.

Maid Brigade suggests creating a paste with baking soda and water for oil-based stains or baking soda and hydrogen peroxide for water-based stains. Slather the paste over the stain and allow it to sit on the surface for several hours, covered.

When you’re ready to clean it up, wipe away the paste, and clean with a warm wash cloth and a small amount of dish soap.


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Kitchen Counters: Granite for Incredible Longevity

When it comes to benchtops you can’t beat granite for its longevity and toughness. Here’s an article we found on Houzz that explores some of the style options and benefits to consider when choosing granite as the material for your kitchen benchtop.

Granite, the same stone that portions of ancient Egyptian pyramids are composed of, is ubiquitous in the kitchen for good reason. This stout stone that can weather millennia easily stands up to kitchen use and abuse. Is granite right for your kitchen? Have a look.


 The basics: Granite is a natural stone, composed of at least 20 percent quartz as well as mica and feldspar. Colors choices span the rainbow, from a monochromatic slab to bold patterns. Countertop finish options include:

  • Polished: The most common finish; it’s mirror-like, stands up well to stains and is the least porous
  • Honed: A matte finish that is typically not recommended, as it can stain and scratch more easily
  • Brushed/satin: Similar to a honed finish, though less matte in appearance and better performing
  • Leather: More polished than a honed or matte finish, but with a little texture
  • Flamed/thermal: Created by running a flame over the slab surface; has a rough, textured appearance and a varying surface depth
  • Antique: Has a brushed, dull appearance that is slightly textured

 Advantages: Granite is tough to beat when it comes to durability, due to its heat- and scratch-resistant qualities; it can bear up to 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit. Granite can also be stain and water resistant when it’s properly sealed. Those seeking an unusual slab or a unique pattern will not be disappointed with the seemingly limitless choices.

Disadvantages: Installation can get tricky due to granite’s hefty nature. And if you choose some of the more exotic slabs, costs can quickly escalate.

Marble or Granite? A Comparison

Choosing the right stone for your project is a big deal! If you’re building or renovating your kitchen or bathroom, granite and marble are likely options you are considering. The choice can be daunting, but the good news is both types of stones boast their own qualities, and each is absolutely stunning.


  • A natural stone with a speckled appearance, available in a range of colours and  dynamic variations in colour and pattern
  • More cost effective
  • Lower-budget options
  • Less maintenence
  • Stronger and harder than marble
  • Less prone to scratches, stains, acid and heat
  • Available in a range of finishes



  • A natural stone with an unique aesthetic, typically light creamy coloured with dark veins throughout.
  • Luminous and luxurious look
  • More expensive
  • More maintenance
  • More prone to scratches, stains, acid and heat.
  • Softer than granite and more absorbent
  • Sensitive to acidic foods such as vinegar, lemon, tomatoes, wine, some cleaners, mildew removers and other materials commonly found in the kitchen or bathroom.
  • Finished is dulled easier
  • Limited colour availability


Here at the Granite Benchtop Company, we recommend granite for any application in the kitchen area. This is because most spills occur in these areas, especially with acidic products. Marble is an excellent and beautiful choice for those who don’t mind a little extra care and maintenance! Marble can be a superb stone to use in home areas than are used less, such as the bathroom or laundry. Often the chemicals we use in these areas are less harsh than those in the kitchen.

If you have any inquiries about granite or marble, just get in touch.